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  • © Holly Craw and Home-School-Community, 2009. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Holly Craw and Home-School-Community with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Scholarships for homeschoolers: Secret for success–high grades and test scores

Derek Davis is a homeschool dad who worked diligently behind the scenes to navigate obstacles and red tape in the process of helping his daughter, Mareike, and son, Severin, to get the scholarships for which they were well qualified.  The problems came in unclear policies, administrative gaffes which went against state law, and perhaps traditional biases against homeschooling.

Since 2000, Bethany’s Law in Arizona required that homeschoolers have the same access to merit scholarships at the state universities that any other students have.  The case is simple for public or private schoolers, since class rank and GPA are automatic triggers in the admissions office to indicate eligibility for the funds.  Without a class rank, homeschool teens may need to be more proactive in knowing what monies their test scores and GPA may net them.

Mareike Davis got caught in a change of policy period in which homeschoolers were denied access to the Regents’ Award full tuition waiver.  This was renamed in 2005 as the Regents’ High Honors Endorsement, and was only accessible through meeting criteria on the Arizona AIMS test, the public school measure of students’ right to graduate from high school.  She did, however, receive the President’s Award in 2009, which at the time covered the tuition costs. Her father discusses the process of getting scholarships for homeschoolers.

What do you want to share about the struggle for Mareike in getting her scholarship?

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