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  • © Holly Craw and Home-School-Community, 2009. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Holly Craw and Home-School-Community with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Homeschoolers with science degrees eligible for $17K graduate scholarship

Become a science teacher and get your graduate school costs covered up to $17,000.

The cost of education is constantly increasing, and homeschool students are among the pool of those looking for scholarships at all levels of higher education.  Attending graduate school could become a huge financial burden, added to undergraduate loans, without substantial financial assistance.

What if choosing a certain undergraduate major could almost guarantee adequate resources for school costs so you could sail through your Master’s program?

If you are majoring in biology, physics, chemistry, and Earth and space science, plan to become a science teacher, and want to attend Arizona State University for your graduate program, you may be a perfect match.  A severe shortage of K-12 science teachers, coupled with the nation’s low ranking in STEM fields, has led to funding incentives for students and professionals who want to continue their education.

The Robert Noyce Scholarship program, authorized under the National Science Foundation Authorization Act, and the Noyce Science Teachers for Arizona – Recruitment and Retention (STARR) will provide scholarships up to $17,000 per year for Master’s candidates meeting these criteria:

  • Be U.S. citizens or nationals
  • Be applying/accepted to the TEAMS graduate program leading to AZ teacher certification within the following disciplines: biology sciences; chemistry; physics; Earth and space science; and general sciences
  • Hold a science degree in biology, chemistry, physics, or earth and space science
  • Have a GPA of at least 2.75 on a 4.0 scale
  • Be committed to teaching in a high-need school for at least two years, for every year of scholarship received.

A high-need school is defined as one:

  • located in an area with a high percentage of individuals from families with incomes below the poverty line; or
  • with a high percentage of secondary teachers not teaching in the content area in which they were trained; or
  • with a high teacher turnover rate.

Application for Summer 2012 funding deadline May 7, 2012 or while funding is available with preference given to early applicants. Required materials include:

  • STARR Noyce Scholarship Application cover letter
  • Two letters of reference from individuals who can describe and comment on the applicant’s character and potential as a science teacher
  • Personal statement about teaching that addresses the applicant’s decision to be a science teacher, desire to work with students, experiences in science, and commitment to work in high-need schools after graduation.

View or download the application.

For more information:

Email Dr. Donna Benson at donna.benson@asu.edu in the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College or call 480-965-5555.

Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College
Office of Student Services
Arizona State University
PO Box 871211
Tempe, AZ 85287-1211
480-965-5555

Information is also available at www.education.asu.edu/noyce and the ASU STARR Noyce Facebook page.

The attached slide presentation includes information about SED 111 – An Introduction to Science Teaching (offered this fall at ASU Tempe), as well as information on the TEAMS graduate program.

Homeschoolers with science degrees eligible for $17K graduate scholarship – Phoenix Homeschooling | Examiner.com.

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